November 2

November has arrived suddenly!  It's been gorgeous - chilly and fresh, and tonight there may be a little snow. I've been rushing to plant hundreds of tulip and daffodil bulbs before it gets really cold.


 

There's so much to be done that I can hardly begin. One thing I have gotten done is to sort through some of the giant collections of silk scraps. Above is a little of the walnut dyed vintage silk.


 


Scraps of indigo dyed silk


Inspiration on the ground.


 

October 30 2018


Several limbs of the beautiful old Kwanzan cherry had to be removed. The backyard is very different now.  The light is harsher and when I go outdoors I feel more exposed.


At least the hickory tree out front is still full. A pair of downy woodpeckers visited yesterday. I don't know who made this giant nest = maybe squirrels?


Some of the day's work. Handspun wool and indigo.

Little changes

Every instantt here are a thousand tiny changes in the garden, the sky and the world.


It's a gift to be able to notice a few of them.  These morning glory vines have climbed up to the back porch window. I love to see these first, even before I step outside.


Brugmansia flower buds  look a bit like baby bananas


Very brief rainbow.


 

October first

The colors are intense. I've been working indoors, clearing out ancient heaps of fabric, papers and projects that will never be complete. I dash outdoors now and then to refresh my eyes and brain!


 

Seeds are getting ripe


 


 

Coreopsis flower dye

I've been collecting these annual coreopsis flowers all summer. They're small but they pack a punch in the dye pot. These plants are getting a little ragged but are still popping out the blossoms.


 


 

 The brew has a nice, fresh medicinal smell


Silk embroidery threads dyed with coreopsis flowers. The one on the right was dyed with coreopsis and madder roots.


 

Middle of August

 


 


 The mornings have been hazy, hot and humid. The air seems yellow.


  


Everything in the garden is growing and changing very fast.


I love the twisted curve of these morning glories.


 

Their leaves are beautiful too.


 


The robins and cardinals love the grapes!

Honey bees

A lot of honey bees have been visiting the garden lately. They love the Impatiens balfourii.


 


 An interestings thing is that they always arrive in the late afternoon and hang around until a little after sunset.


 


 The really interesting thing is that they don;t go inside the flowers like other bees. They grasp the tail end of the flower and seem to drink nectar from this part.

August

 


Summer is ripening


 


 Phlox has a sweet, somehow sad fragrance


 


To commemorate the end of July, I made a small harvest of Japanese Indigo leaves yesterday. . I dyed some silk organza.


Selenicereus grandiflorus

 


Selenicereus grandiflorus

After several years, the selenicereus plant has bloomed!.


 


The buds are quite interesting.  They start out as a fuzzy white spot on the stem, then grow to look like a rabbits' foot.


 


 The flower bud pushes through the fuzz and elongates. To the immature mind, this can be a great source of silly laughter...:)


 


A little more dignified...


 


Some white showing through


 


Almost ready


 


Like fireworks! 


 

July

 So far, July has been packed with projects and flowers



 Indigo and cochineal shibori scarves


 


Hand-spun silk yarn dyed with  woad


More Naturally dyed embroidery silks


 


Inspiration!


 

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